It is that time of year…fireworks!

The Firework season is less than a week away and at Aussie Dog Care we know how much distress any pet can go through during this time!

So here is some fantastic information from the RSPCA.

“Keeping cats and dogs secure

  • Make sure your dog or cat always has somewhere to hide if he or she wants to and has access to this place at all times. For example this could be under some furniture or in a cupboard.
  • During firework seasons, walk dogs during daylight hours and keep cats and dogs indoors when fireworks are likely to be set off.
  • At nightfall close windows and curtains and put on music to mask and muffle the sound of fireworks.
  • If your pet shows any signs of fear try to ignore their behaviour. Leave them alone unless they are likely to harm themselves.
  • Never punish or fuss over your pet when it’s scared as this will only make things worse in the long run.
  • Make sure your cat or dog is always kept in a safe and secure environment and can’t escape if there’s a sudden noise. Have your pet microchipped in case they do escape.

Just for dogs – before the firework  season starts

Planning ahead can help your dog cope with the firework season.

Talk to your vet about pheromone diffusers. These disperse calming chemicals into the room and may be a good option for your dog, in some cases your vet may even prescribe medication. If either of these options is used they should be used in conjunction with behavioural therapy. We would recommend asking your vet to refer you to a clinical animal behaviourist or using the ‘Sounds Scary’ therapy pack (see below).

Before the firework season starts provide your dog with a doggy safe haven, this should be a quiet area so choose one of the quietist rooms in your home. It should be a place where the animal feels it is in control, so don’t interfere with it when it’s in that area. Train your dog to associate the area with positive experiences eg. by leaving toys there but not imposing yourself at any time. Use a variety of toys and swap them regularly, putting them away when not in use so that your dog doesn’t become bored with them. With time your dog can learn that this place is safe and enjoyable. So when fireworks happen it may choose to go here because it knows that when it is here, no harm will come to it and so it’s more able to cope. It is important that your dog has access to its doggy safe haven at all times even when you’re not at home.
 

Just for dogs – when the fireworks start

  • Close any windows and black out the ‘doggy play area’ to remove any extra problems caused by flashing lights.
  • Each evening before the fireworks begin, move your dog to the play area and provide toys and other things that they enjoy. Make sure that there are things for you to do too so that your dog isn’t left alone.
  • Ignore the firework noises yourself. Play with a toy to see if your dog wants to join in, but don’t force them to play.
  • If you know a dog that isn’t scared by noises and which gets on well with your dog, then keeping the two together during the evenings may help your dog to realise that there’s no need to be afraid.

Sounds Scary – for dogs

In the long term your dog needs to learn to be less afraid of loud noises. With proper treatment this is possible so that the next firework season will be less stressful for you and your dog.

We recommend Sounds Scary, an easy to follow therapy pack for dogs which includes a specially made set of high quality sound recordings and an easy to follow guide. The amount of training needed will vary from dog to dog so owners should start training with the Sounds Scary pack well in advance of firework seasons. Visit Sound Therapy 4 Pets for more information and to download the therapy pack.
 

Just for cats

  • Make sure your cat has somewhere to hide if it wants to. For example this may be under some furniture or in a quiet corner.
  • Don’t try and tempt your cat out as this will cause it to become more stressed.

Don’t forget small animals

  • If your pets live outside, partly cover cages, pens and aviaries with blankets so that one area is well sound-proofed. Make sure that your pet is still able to look out.
  • Provide lots of extra bedding so your pet has something to burrow in.”

Above quoted from http://www.rspca.org.uk/home

Photo credit:http://www.gainsborough.hackney.sch.uk
Photo credit:http://www.gainsborough.hackney.sch.uk

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

Insect Bites and Dogs.

Over the past few weeks Aussie Dog Care has seen an increasing number of dogs with insect bites so here is some fantastic advice on what to do and how to spot them on dogs. They are increasingly common in any pet!

 

“Symptoms

Insect bites on dogs can include the following reactions:

  • Swelling on the eyelids
  • Swelling on ear flaps
  • Swelling on the lips and in some cases the entire face. In this case, it is known as angiedema.
  • If the dog is bitten on the nose or mouth, it will lead to large swelling and the animal will have difficulty breathing
  • Urticaria, also known as “hives” which displays as welts are observed on the skin. These bites are usually itchy and can cause anaphylactic reactions.
  • Wheezing
  • Weakness
  • Unconsciousness
  • Weak pulse
  • Increased heart rate and fever which may cause the animal to go into shock.
  • Other symptoms of insect bites on dogs may lead to cold extremities, trembling, vomiting, diarrhea and collapse.

Blood sucking insects like mosquitoes, fleas, ticks, etc. cause swelling and irritation on the bite site. These insects contain some compounds in their saliva that aggravates this effect on the dog’s skin and may also cause tiny bumps on the skin. Spider bites cause large swollen bumps because the e spider bite contains an enzyme in the injected venom that leads to an allergic reaction on the dog’s skin.

Treatment

Few insect bites on dogs are extremely dangerous, but some can be very irritating and painful to your dog. There are some home remedies for treating insect bites on dogs that are safe and effective. Below are some suggestions:

  1. In the case of bee or wasp stings, apply aloe vera gel. It helps sooth the pain and burning sensation due to the sting or bite. 
  2. For bumps and sores, you can try gently applying a paste of baking soda and water several times a day till the bumps recede.
  3. For irritation, try applying milk of magnesia, calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream several times a day to ease the irritation. You can also apply regular oatmeal or colloidal oatmeal on the bite site to help relieve the irritation.
  4. As previously mentioned, remember to remove the stinger with a magnifying glass using a credit card or similar object. Once the stinger gone, bathe the area with a diluted solution of baking soda mixed with water. Prepare the solution by adding one part baking soda to several parts water. Apply a cold pack for several minutes to help reduce the swelling and pain. Repeat the cold pack several times a day. 
  5. You can mix 1 teaspoon of Epsom salt in 2 cups warm water and boil it. Keep it in the refrigerator to maintain its freshness. Bathe the dog with this mixture, to treat irritated and itchy paws and skin. To treat hot spots on skin, saturate a cotton ball with witch hazel and apply it to the spot for several days.

Many dogs develop allergic reactions to bites and stings that require immediate veterinary attention. If the bites are on the face, the swelling may obstruct the dog’s vision or breathing. If you find the dog is having trouble breathing or seems disoriented, take him to the vet immediately. You may need to seek veterinary attention if the dog is bitten by a spider, as their venom can cause a more serious reaction than bees or wasps.

It is very important to take care of your dog in case he is bitten by any insect. Even a minor mosquito bite can lead to an infection as the dog tends to keep scratching the itchy area. This can lead to infection by other pathogens which may cause other problems like pus or fever in your dog. Pet care is the owner’s responsibility. To give the best possible care to your dog please make sure you do not take insect bites lightly, as the life of your pet may depend on your alertness.”

Above quoted from http://www.petassure.com/newsletters/021510newsletter/02152010article2.html

 

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

Fireworks and Animals!

The Firework season is fast approaching and at Aussie Dog Care we know how much distress any pet can go through during this season.

So here is some fantastic information from the RSPCA.

“Keeping cats and dogs secure

  • Make sure your dog or cat always has somewhere to hide if he or she wants to and has access to this place at all times. For example this could be under some furniture or in a cupboard.
  • During firework seasons, walk dogs during daylight hours and keep cats and dogs indoors when fireworks are likely to be set off.
  • At nightfall close windows and curtains and put on music to mask and muffle the sound of fireworks.
  • If your pet shows any signs of fear try to ignore their behaviour. Leave them alone unless they are likely to harm themselves.
  • Never punish or fuss over your pet when it’s scared as this will only make things worse in the long run.
  • Make sure your cat or dog is always kept in a safe and secure environment and can’t escape if there’s a sudden noise. Have your pet microchipped in case they do escape.

Just for dogs – before the firework  season starts

Planning ahead can help your dog cope with the firework season.

Talk to your vet about pheromone diffusers. These disperse calming chemicals into the room and may be a good option for your dog, in some cases your vet may even prescribe medication. If either of these options is used they should be used in conjunction with behavioural therapy. We would recommend asking your vet to refer you to a clinical animal behaviourist or using the ‘Sounds Scary’ therapy pack (see below).

Before the firework season starts provide your dog with a doggy safe haven, this should be a quiet area so choose one of the quietist rooms in your home. It should be a place where the animal feels it is in control, so don’t interfere with it when it’s in that area. Train your dog to associate the area with positive experiences eg. by leaving toys there but not imposing yourself at any time. Use a variety of toys and swap them regularly, putting them away when not in use so that your dog doesn’t become bored with them. With time your dog can learn that this place is safe and enjoyable. So when fireworks happen it may choose to go here because it knows that when it is here, no harm will come to it and so it’s more able to cope. It is important that your dog has access to its doggy safe haven at all times even when you’re not at home.
 

Just for dogs – when the fireworks start

  • Close any windows and black out the ‘doggy play area’ to remove any extra problems caused by flashing lights.
  • Each evening before the fireworks begin, move your dog to the play area and provide toys and other things that they enjoy. Make sure that there are things for you to do too so that your dog isn’t left alone.
  • Ignore the firework noises yourself. Play with a toy to see if your dog wants to join in, but don’t force them to play.
  • If you know a dog that isn’t scared by noises and which gets on well with your dog, then keeping the two together during the evenings may help your dog to realise that there’s no need to be afraid.

Sounds Scary – for dogs

In the long term your dog needs to learn to be less afraid of loud noises. With proper treatment this is possible so that the next firework season will be less stressful for you and your dog.

We recommend Sounds Scary, an easy to follow therapy pack for dogs which includes a specially made set of high quality sound recordings and an easy to follow guide. The amount of training needed will vary from dog to dog so owners should start training with the Sounds Scary pack well in advance of firework seasons. Visit Sound Therapy 4 Pets for more information and to download the therapy pack.
 

Just for cats

  • Make sure your cat has somewhere to hide if it wants to. For example this may be under some furniture or in a quiet corner.
  • Don’t try and tempt your cat out as this will cause it to become more stressed.

Don’t forget small animals

  • If your pets live outside, partly cover cages, pens and aviaries with blankets so that one area is well sound-proofed. Make sure that your pet is still able to look out.
  • Provide lots of extra bedding so your pet has something to burrow in.”

Above quoted from http://www.rspca.org.uk/home

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

Staying Safe on Dog Walks

At Aussie Dog Care safety is key and on walks dogs always come first! Here are some key tips whilst dog walking from Your Dog.

“Our own safety and well-being often takes second place to our dogs when out on walks, but while such concern is understandable, it’s not always wise. There can be many potential dangers lying in wait and putting yourself first isn’t being selfish but sensible – but safe. After all, if you’re safe it’s more likely your pet will be too. Obviously there is no way you can completely guarantee your safety but there are a number of ways in which you can certainly minimize the risks.

Dress for the occasion

No matter how keen your dog id to go for a walk, take time to kit yourself out properly before leaving, Sensible footwear is vital to help keep your balance if your dog suddenly pulls on the lead as well as when tackling loose, wet or muddy surfaces, even if your just popping out for a short stroll you might need to run in an emergency.

Wear appropriate clothes, bearing in mind that the weather can change dramatically in some places, particularly in mountainous or moorland areas. If you are going to be out in the dark or when it is dul or misty, don’t just kit your dog out in high vis gear, wear it yourself -if nothing else it will ensure that joggers using the same paths don’t collide with you.

When you dog is running loose put his lead in your pocket or hold it in your hand – don’t loop it around your neck where it could be grabbed by someone. Before you go Get a weather report before setting out and be prepared to disappoint your dog by either turning back or taking a safe, shouter route if conditions deteriorate. When out in milder, more remote regions pack a rucksack with extra survival kit in case of an emergency. No matter where you’re going always take your mobile (make sure it is fully charged) and whistle just in case you need to call for help or to alert rescuers to your position. And although it seems obvious, an often neglected precaution is simply to tell someone where you’re going and how long you expect to be, even if your just planning to go around the block.

Stay alert

Chatting on your mobile or wearing headphones will make it easier for others to sneak up on you and you lack of concentration could even single you out as a tempting target for would-be attackers. Don’t daydream – as well as watching what your dog is up to and keeping an eye out for potential problems from other walkers and dogs, try to be aware of where you’re putting your feet. If you stumble down a pot hole, trip over a tree root or miss your step on rutted ground you could twist your ankle or worse. Make sure your vision isn’t impared by a hood-they are warm but restrict peripheral vision and you have to turn your whole body instead of just your head to glance behind you. If it’s chilly or wet wear a separate hat instead.

Livestock and wildlife

Although walking in the countryside is statistically safer than in the city, don’t be complacent in open areas. By law you must control your dog so that he doesn’t scare, worry or disturb farm animals or wildlife. On most areas of open country and common land you should keep your dog on a fixed lead no longer than 6ft long between March 1 and July 31 (the season for all ground nesting birds) and at all times of the year near livestock. Livestock can sometimes behave unpredictably, particularly cattle. Cows with calves may become aggressive if they think their young are threatened, while young cattle are often inquisitive and may gallop up to you.

Take sensible precautions – Never walk between a cow and her calf, don’t shout or wave sticks at them and head for the nearest exit if you feel threatened. If necessary let your dog loose while you make your escape – the cow is likely to loose interest in you and your dog can run faster. Wildlife can equally be protective of their young – hinds can be aggressive at calving time and there has been reports of them charging dogs and walkers.

And don’t forget to…

  • Use up to date maps, know how to read them and use a compass.
  • Take advice or stick to marked paths in areas where there are bogs and quicksands.
  • Check whether restrictions are in place before exercising your right to roam.
  • Never ignore warning signs.
  • Exercise care when crossing fast-flowing steams particularly after heavy rains when water levels can rise rapidly and flash floods can occur.
  • Avoid dark, poorly lit alleyways and paths during early morning or late night walks. Use pavements where possible; if there isn’t one , walk on the side of the road facing oncoming traffic , crossing to the other side on right hand bends.”

Above quoted from http://www.yourdog.co.uk/

Dog Walks.
Dog Walks.

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

Winter Weather and Dogs.

We really love dogs at Aussie Dog Care Based in Romiley Stockport so here is some advice in the winter days to come ..or have started!

“At the coldest times of year, there are many precautions that can be taken to keep dogs safe and well despite heavy rain, snow and ice. Our Veterinary Director, Paula Boyden, suggests the following:

  • Let your dog’s winter coat grow, and if you have a puppy, short-haired or old dog it is a good idea to buy him a sensible coat to keep out the chill. 
  • After walking your dog or if he has been out in the rain, make sure he iscompletely dried so that he does not catch a cold. Consider using our Paw Protection Cream and Snout Balm to prevent and soothe cracked pads and snouts.
  • Keep your dog on a lead if it is snowing very heavily. Snow can be disorienting and can affect a dog’s sense of smell so he could become lost easily.
  • Make sure your dog is microchipped and wearing an ID tag in case he does get lost.
  • Grit used to melt snow can cut their paws and make sure you wipe your dog’s legs, feet and stomach when you come indoors after a snowy walk. Washing and wiping your dog’s feet after walks will also prevent stray lumps of ice getting painfully trapped in their paws.
  • Antifreeze is highly poisonous but tasty to dogs! Keep it well out of their reach.
  • Never leave your dog in a car during extreme weather, hot or cold.
  • Do not let your dog walk on frozen ponds – the ice may not be thick enough to take his weight.
  • If your dog does fall through the ice never be tempted to go after them but encourage them to swim back to you.”

Above quoted from http://www.dogstrust.org.uk/az/w/winter/#.UjeBh-ApKyc

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs