Goyt Valley

 
At Aussie Dog Care we love our walks around the countryside and Goyt Valley is one of them . It is a beautiful place to go on a long walks with dogs or with the whole family.
“The Goyt Valley is located between Macclesfield and Buxton in the Peak District National Park, England. The valley is close to the Cheshire and Derbyshire county border.The River Goyt that flows through the valley rises high on Axe Edge Moor near the Cat and Fiddle Public House, (the second highest public house in England) and flows north through Taxal, Whaley Bridge and New Mills before joining with the River Tame near Stockport to form the River Mersey. This website concentrates on the area known as the Upper Goyt Valley close to the source of the River Goyt.” From http://www.goytvalley.co.uk/about.htm
Three Walks below from http://www.walkthehills.co.uk/peak%20district/three-goyt-valley-walks-shining-tor-cats-tor-windgather-rocks-taxal-moor.html
“Three walks based around the Goyt Valley’s excellent western ridge, stretching from Shining Tor in the south to Taxal Moor in the north. The walks all start in the valley itself between Fernilee and Errwood Reservoirs, and begin with an ascent to Shining Tor via the Stake Side/Shooter’s Clough ridge, followed by a stroll down the main ridge from Shining Tor to Pym Chair via Cats Tor.

Route 1 then returns via Foxlow Edge to Shooter’s Clough Bridge (as per the Goyt Valley Horseshoe) – this is a short but fantastic walk and probably the best walk when time’s short or as a great introduction to the mighty and all-conquering Goyt Valley

Route 2 continues north from Pym Chair, keeping on the moorland parallel to the minor road, until Windgather Rocks. This is a popular spot for climbers and a good place for a lunch stop. The route then heads east, past Taxal Moor Road and down into the valley. After crossing Mill Clough, a farm track then takes you to Fernilee Reservoir and the return stroll along the old railway line.

Route 3 continues from Windgather Rocks along the ridge of Taxal Moor (access land – no path marked on OS map, but it’s there on the ground) and then east back down to the River Goyt. The route then heads south along the river and Fernilee Reservoir. Great walking in one of the best areas of the Peak District.” From http://www.walkthehills.co.uk/peak%20district/three-goyt-valley-walks-shining-tor-cats-tor-windgather-rocks-taxal-moor.html

From -http://www.mdoc.org.uk/tp2006/goyt_valley.jpg
From -http://www.mdoc.org.uk/tp2006/goyt_valley.jpg
  • The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to yo

Foods Toxic For Dogs

At Aussie Dog Care we would like to share with you some foods which are toxic for dogs. All the below information is quoted from http://www.caninejournal.com/foods-not-to-feed-dog which is a great website for anything to do with caring for your beloved pet. I hope this blog post makes you aware of foods which are highly toxic for dogs.

“Alcohol – I’m sure you’ve heard of the birthday parties where the dog accidentally gets into some of the spilled keg beer, and then gets all silly to the amusement of the crowd. While it may be funny to you, it’s not funny to your dog. Alcohol can cause not only intoxication, lack of coordination, poor breathing, and abnormal acidity, but potentially even coma and/or death.

Apple Seeds – Apple seeds are toxic to a dog as they contain a natural chemical that releases cyanide when digested. So, be sure to core and seed apples before you feed them to your dog.

Avocado – Avocados contain Persin, which can cause diarrhea, vomiting, and heart congestion.

Baby food – Baby food by itself isn’t terrible, just make sure it doesn’t contain any onion powder. Baby food also doesn’t contain all the nutrients a dog relies on for a healthy, well maintained diet.

Bones – The danger with bones isn’t the nutritional content, nor is it necessarily the danger of chocking. Rather, you need to be careful with bones from meat sources such as chicken and fish because they can harm your dog’s digestive tract when the bones splinter inside the body.

Candy and chewing gum – Not only does candy contain sugar, but it often contains Xilotyl, which can lead to the over-release of insulin, kidney failure, and worse.

Cat food – Not that they would want this anyways 😉 but cat food contains proteins and fats that are targeted at the diet of a cat, not a dog. The protein and fat levels in cat food are too high for your dog, and not healthy.

Chocolate – You’ve probably heard this before, but chocolate is a definite no no for your pup. And it’s not just about caffeine, which is enough to harm your dog by itself, but theobromine and theophylline, which can be toxic, cause panting, vomiting, and diarrhea, and damage your dog’s heart and nervous systems.

Citrus oil extracts – Can cause vomiting.

Coffee – Not sure why you would give your dog coffee, but pretty much the same applies here as to chocolate. This is essentially poison for your dog if ingested.

Corn on the cob – This is a sure way to get your dog’s intestine blocked. The corn is digested, but the cob gets lodged in the small intestine, and if it’s not removed surgically, can prove fatal to your dog. Additionally, too much corn kernels can upset the digestive tract as well so be cautious to not feed to much.

Fat trimmings – Can cause pancreatitis.

Fish – The primary fish that you need to be careful about are salmon and trout. Raw salmon can be fatal to dogs if the fish is infected with a certain parasite, Nanophyetus salmincola. The parasite itself isn’t dangerous to dogs, but is often infected with a bacteria called Neorickettsia helminthoeca, which in many cases is fatal to dogs if not treated properly. If diagnosis occurs early on, the dog has a great chance of recovering. Cooked salmon is fine as it kills the parasite.

Grapes and raisins – This is one that lots of dog owners are unaware of. Grapes contain a toxin that can cause severe liver damage and kidney failure. We’ve heard stories of dogs dying from only a handful of grapes so do not feed your pup this toxic food.

Hops – An ingredient in beer that can be toxic to your dog. The consumption of hops by your dog can cause panting, an increased heart rate, fever, seizures, and even death.

Human vitamins – Some human vitamins are okay to use, but the key is comparing the ingredients (all of them – active and inactive) to the vitamins your vet subscribes for your dog (often you can get the human equivalent for much less money). Make sure there’s no iron – iron can damage the digestive system lining, and prove poisonous for the liver and kidneys.

Liver – Avoid feeding too much liver to your dog. Liver contains quite a bit of Vitamin A, which can adversely affect your pup’s muscles and bones.

Macadamia nuts – These contain a toxin that can inhibit locomotory activities, resulting in weakness, panting, swollen limbs, and tremors as well as possible damage to your dog’s digestive, nervous, and muscle systems.

Marijuana – Not that you would pass the bong to your dog, but if you do, you should know that it can adversely affect your pup’s nervous system and heart rate, and induce vomiting.

Milk and dairy products – While small doses aren’t going to kill your dog, you could get some smelly farts and some nasty cases of diarrhea. Why? Dogs are lactose intolerant (as are an increasing number of humans today), and don’t have enough of the lactase enzyme to properly digest dairy foods. If you really need to give them dairy, look into lactose-free dairy products.

Mushrooms – Just as the wrong mushroom can be fatal to humans, the same applies to dogs. Don’t mess with them.

Onions, garlic, and chives – No matter what form they’re in (dry, raw, cooked, powder, within other foods), onions and garlic (especially onions) are some of the absolute worst foods you could possibly give your pup (it’s poisonous for dogs, and its even worse for cats). They contain disulfides and sulfoxides (thiosulphate), both of which can cause anemia and damage red blood cells.
Persimmons, peaches, and plums – If you live in an area that is home to persimmon, peach, or plum trees, look out. Persimmon seeds and peach and plum pits can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis. You’ll want to make sure there aren’t any wild persimmon or other fruit trees that produce seeds growing in your backyard. If you notice your dog pooping all over the place, and see a bunch of seeds or pits in their waste, you’ll need to break out the saw and chop down some trees.
Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves – These contain oxalates, which can adversely affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems.

Raw eggs – The most obvious problem here is salmonella. But raw eggs also contain the Avidin enzyme, which inhibits the absorption of vitamin B (Biotin). Your dog uses vitamin B to keep a healthy coat and skin.

Raw fish – Another vitamin B (Thiamine) deficiency can result from the regular consumption of raw fish. Loss of appetite will be common, followed by seizures, and in rare instances, death.

Salt – Just like salt isn’t the healthiest thing for humans, it’s even less healthy for dogs. Too much of it can lead to an imbalance in electrolyte levels, dehydration and potentially diarrhea.

String – While not a food itself, foods can often contain or be similar to string (ie. meat you’ve wrapped for the oven). If your dog were to eat a string, it could get stuck in their digestive tract and cause complications.

Sugar – This applies to any food containing sugar. Make sure you check the ingredient label for human foods – corn syrup (which is a less expensive form of sugar or glucose) is found in just about everything these days. Too much sugar for your pup can lead to dental issues, obesity, and even diabetes.

Tobacco – A major toxic hazard for dogs (and humans). The effects nicotine has on dogs are far worse than on humans. Nicotine can damage your pup’s digestive and nervous systems, increase their heart rate, make them pass out, and ultimately result in death.

Xylitol – A sugar alcohol found in gum, candies, baked goods, and other sugar-substituted items, Xylitol, while causing no apparent harm to humans, is extremely toxic to dogs. Even small amounts can cause low blood sugar, seizures, liver failure, even death for your pup.

Yeast (on its own or in dough) – Just like yeast rises in bread, it will also expand and rise within your pup’s tummy. Make sure they don’t get any. While mild cases will cause gas, lots of farting, and discomfort – too much of it could rupture their stomach and intestines.”

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

Walking Route around Chadkirk

When looking on the internet a while back I found a great article on a walk around Chadkirk and here it is,   quoted from http://www.marple-uk.com/chadkirk.htm . At Aussie Dog Care we enjoyed this historic walk and the information on marple uk was fantastic on informing me about Chadkirk and the surrounding areas past.

“1)     On leaving the Car Park adjacent to Rose Hill station make your way    back to Stockport Road, cross the zebra crossing and turn left. After about 100 yards turn    right into Marple Hall Drive. Follow this road for about 400 yards until it makes a right    angle turn.

2)     Proceed straight ahead, past the site of Marple Hall. This stately mansion was where John Bradshawe lived as a    young man. In later life in his role as President of the High Court of Justice he signed    King Charles I death warrant.

Unfortunately in the    1950s, after the caretaker died, the vandals moved in and reduced the building to a ruin    in a matter of months.

The ground falls away steeply to your right    and although there are a number of paths leading down, follow the main path alongside the    edge of the playing fields of Marple Hall School.

Through the trees you will be able to see the    River Goyt in the valley. The Goyt and the Tame combine near Stockport to form the River    Mersey.

3)     The path eventually drops down to Dooley Lane. Turn right past the    Garden Centre and over Otterspool Bridge. This was the extreme boundary of the old forest    of Macclesfield. After a short distance turn right past the car park and follow the road    to Chadkirk Chapel.

Chadkirk has the distinction, unlike Marple, of being mentioned in the Domesday Book. The whole manor was 3 miles long and 11/2 miles wide of which most was woodland. The value was assessed to be worth 10 shillings.

4) Although legend has it that Chadkirk is associated with the 7th century missionary St Chad, the present Chapel dates back to the early 16th century although it has been restored on a    number of occasions since then. The building is now owned by Stockport Council and is open    to the public on Saturday and Sundays between 1.00 pm and 5.00 pm (admission free). There    is an audio/visual show giving the history of the chapel and St. Chad.

Adjoining the chapel is a farm which is also open to the public at certain times.

Follow the road past the farm. On the left as you go up the hill you will pass St Chad’s Well and an information board gives you details    of this historic site.

At the top of the hill some stone steps on the right take you up to the canal.

5) At this point you have the first choice of route. See below for alternative Route B.

On    reaching the canal turn right along the towpath. As you will see the canal has been cut    out of the steep hillside and its construction over 200 years ago is a monument to the skill of the canal engineers of the time with the limited resources available to them.

6) Opposite the canalside factory is a path on the right for alternative Route C. See bottom of page for details.

Shortly after passing the factory the canal enters the    308 yard Hyde Bank tunnel which although only being a short tunnel has no towpath    requiring horsedrawn narrowboats to be legged through. Take the path over the top passing    a farm before bearing right and following a steepish path down to rejoin the canal.

The canal continues its path along the side    of the hill until, after passing under a bridge, it enters a relatively narrow section for    a hundred yards or so. This was formerly Rose Hill tunnel which collapsed over 100 years    ago and rather than rebuild it they opened it up. In 1997 the embankment became unstable    and had to be strengthened, substantially, at a cost of £300,000.

Just ahead the canal crosses the    Marple Aqueduct. This magnificent structure built 200 years ago stands 100ft above the    river Goyt. In the early 1960s this structure was faced with closure when a severe frost    so badly damaged it that it was uncertain whether it would ever reopen to navigation. As a    consequence the flight of locks also fell into disrepair and it was only the sterling    efforts of a group of enthusiasts who formed the Peak Forest Canal Society that eventually    both the aqueduct and locks were saved.

7) Continue    alongside the locks until you reach lock 7 where you cross the bridge close to the bottom    gates and head for a footpath marked with two metal stakes.

This path, after about    150 yards, meets up with Winnington Road. Cross over and make your way up Grosvenor Road.    At the junction with Manor Road continue straight ahead to a footpath known as Seven    Stiles. The stiles have long gone but the footpath happily remains. Follow the path which    after about 200 yards crosses a road before leading down to another path. After a short    distance you follow the boundary of Marple Cricket Club.

Eventually the path terminates on Bowden    Lane. Turn right and over the railway bridge. Turn left onto Dale Road and follow this to    Stockport Road. The car park is just across the road.”

Chadkirk Chapel From http://www.picturesofengland.com/img/L/1032657.jpg
Chadkirk Chapel From http://www.picturesofengland.com/img/L/1032657.jpg

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Wilmslow , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs.