Fireworks and Animals!

The Firework season is upon us and at Aussie Dog Care we know how much distress any pet can go through during this season.

So here is some fantastic information from the RSPCA.

“Keeping cats and dogs secure

  • Make sure your dog or cat always has somewhere to hide if he or she wants to and has access to this place at all times. For example this could be under some furniture or in a cupboard.
  • During firework seasons, walk dogs during daylight hours and keep cats and dogs indoors when fireworks are likely to be set off.
  • At nightfall close windows and curtains and put on music to mask and muffle the sound of fireworks.
  • If your pet shows any signs of fear try to ignore their behaviour. Leave them alone unless they are likely to harm themselves.
  • Never punish or fuss over your pet when it’s scared as this will only make things worse in the long run.
  • Make sure your cat or dog is always kept in a safe and secure environment and can’t escape if there’s a sudden noise. Have your pet microchipped in case they do escape.

Just for dogs – before the firework  season starts

Planning ahead can help your dog cope with the firework season.

Talk to your vet about pheromone diffusers. These disperse calming chemicals into the room and may be a good option for your dog, in some cases your vet may even prescribe medication. If either of these options is used they should be used in conjunction with behavioural therapy. We would recommend asking your vet to refer you to a clinical animal behaviourist or using the ‘Sounds Scary’ therapy pack (see below).

Before the firework season starts provide your dog with a doggy safe haven, this should be a quiet area so choose one of the quietist rooms in your home. It should be a place where the animal feels it is in control, so don’t interfere with it when it’s in that area. Train your dog to associate the area with positive experiences eg. by leaving toys there but not imposing yourself at any time. Use a variety of toys and swap them regularly, putting them away when not in use so that your dog doesn’t become bored with them. With time your dog can learn that this place is safe and enjoyable. So when fireworks happen it may choose to go here because it knows that when it is here, no harm will come to it and so it’s more able to cope. It is important that your dog has access to its doggy safe haven at all times even when you’re not at home.
 

Just for dogs – when the fireworks start

  • Close any windows and black out the ‘doggy play area’ to remove any extra problems caused by flashing lights.
  • Each evening before the fireworks begin, move your dog to the play area and provide toys and other things that they enjoy. Make sure that there are things for you to do too so that your dog isn’t left alone.
  • Ignore the firework noises yourself. Play with a toy to see if your dog wants to join in, but don’t force them to play.
  • If you know a dog that isn’t scared by noises and which gets on well with your dog, then keeping the two together during the evenings may help your dog to realise that there’s no need to be afraid.

Sounds Scary – for dogs

In the long term your dog needs to learn to be less afraid of loud noises. With proper treatment this is possible so that the next firework season will be less stressful for you and your dog.

We recommend Sounds Scary, an easy to follow therapy pack for dogs which includes a specially made set of high quality sound recordings and an easy to follow guide. The amount of training needed will vary from dog to dog so owners should start training with the Sounds Scary pack well in advance of firework seasons. Visit Sound Therapy 4 Pets for more information and to download the therapy pack.
 

Just for cats

  • Make sure your cat has somewhere to hide if it wants to. For example this may be under some furniture or in a quiet corner.
  • Don’t try and tempt your cat out as this will cause it to become more stressed.

Don’t forget small animals

  • If your pets live outside, partly cover cages, pens and aviaries with blankets so that one area is well sound-proofed. Make sure that your pet is still able to look out.
  • Provide lots of extra bedding so your pet has something to burrow in.”

Above quoted from http://www.rspca.org.uk/home

 

However have a great bonfire night from all of us at Aussie Dog Care!

 

Fireworks!
Fireworks!

 

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

Protecting Your Dog Against Fleas and Ticks

At Aussie Dog Care we know the difficulties of removing Fleas and Ticks so hopefully this information will help protect your dogs against Fleas and Ticks!

Flea and Ticks are normally around during warmer summer months however the odd few do seem to reappear from time to time as we know!

Below Text Quoted from http://www.cesarsway.com/

“Ticks survive the winter in microclimates, and after the thaw a feeding and breeding female tick can lay hundreds to thousands of eggs at one time2. Fleas can survive freezing temperatures on wild or feral animals, cocooned as immature pupae, or inside houses and buildings3. With temperatures in the 50s, 60’s, and even 70s, an early spring also means an early season for these bloodsucking parasites.

It’s practically impossible to keep fleas and ticks completely at bay. But there are some steps you can take to try and minimize the opportunities for contact with your pet.

Fleas.Wildlife, including opossums, coyotes, raccoons, and skunks, and even untreated cats and dogs can deposit flea eggs into a yard. It may be possible to reduce flea infestations by limiting the access these animals have around your house and yard. Your local nursery or garden professional may have some advice on what to plant or other strategies to discourage animal trespassers.

Ticks It can be helpful for pet owners to alter the landscape around their homes to make it unsuitable for ticks and their hosts. For example, keep the lawn mowed, remove leaf litter accumulations and prune shrubs and trees.4

Contact a professional pest specialist if you have any questions regarding environmental treatments for ticks.

 

Use a Flea and Tick Control Product

 

Despite your efforts to reduce the fleas and ticks in your yards, our pets may still be exposed to these parasites, so you should take measures to help protect them. Treat all dogs and cats in the household with a flea and tick control product. One untreated pet can lead to a flea infestation in the household.

FRONTLINE® brand products can help protect your dog from unexpected flea and tick sources by killing adult fleas, eggs and larvae, and all stages of ticks. FRONTLINE Plus not only stops existing flea infestations, but also prevents the establishment of new infestations.

Consistency is key. Even one missed dose of your monthly flea and tick control can set the stage for a flea infestation that takes months to resolve, or put your pet at greater risk of exposure to a tick borne disease. So be sure you treat your pet now and continue monthly applications throughout the rest of the year.”

Read more: http://www.cesarsway.com/flea-and-tick-awareness/How-to-Protect-Your-Dog-Against-Fleas-and-Ticks#ixzz2dlejOO50

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

It is that time of year…fireworks!

The Firework season is less than a week away and at Aussie Dog Care we know how much distress any pet can go through during this time!

So here is some fantastic information from the RSPCA.

“Keeping cats and dogs secure

  • Make sure your dog or cat always has somewhere to hide if he or she wants to and has access to this place at all times. For example this could be under some furniture or in a cupboard.
  • During firework seasons, walk dogs during daylight hours and keep cats and dogs indoors when fireworks are likely to be set off.
  • At nightfall close windows and curtains and put on music to mask and muffle the sound of fireworks.
  • If your pet shows any signs of fear try to ignore their behaviour. Leave them alone unless they are likely to harm themselves.
  • Never punish or fuss over your pet when it’s scared as this will only make things worse in the long run.
  • Make sure your cat or dog is always kept in a safe and secure environment and can’t escape if there’s a sudden noise. Have your pet microchipped in case they do escape.

Just for dogs – before the firework  season starts

Planning ahead can help your dog cope with the firework season.

Talk to your vet about pheromone diffusers. These disperse calming chemicals into the room and may be a good option for your dog, in some cases your vet may even prescribe medication. If either of these options is used they should be used in conjunction with behavioural therapy. We would recommend asking your vet to refer you to a clinical animal behaviourist or using the ‘Sounds Scary’ therapy pack (see below).

Before the firework season starts provide your dog with a doggy safe haven, this should be a quiet area so choose one of the quietist rooms in your home. It should be a place where the animal feels it is in control, so don’t interfere with it when it’s in that area. Train your dog to associate the area with positive experiences eg. by leaving toys there but not imposing yourself at any time. Use a variety of toys and swap them regularly, putting them away when not in use so that your dog doesn’t become bored with them. With time your dog can learn that this place is safe and enjoyable. So when fireworks happen it may choose to go here because it knows that when it is here, no harm will come to it and so it’s more able to cope. It is important that your dog has access to its doggy safe haven at all times even when you’re not at home.
 

Just for dogs – when the fireworks start

  • Close any windows and black out the ‘doggy play area’ to remove any extra problems caused by flashing lights.
  • Each evening before the fireworks begin, move your dog to the play area and provide toys and other things that they enjoy. Make sure that there are things for you to do too so that your dog isn’t left alone.
  • Ignore the firework noises yourself. Play with a toy to see if your dog wants to join in, but don’t force them to play.
  • If you know a dog that isn’t scared by noises and which gets on well with your dog, then keeping the two together during the evenings may help your dog to realise that there’s no need to be afraid.

Sounds Scary – for dogs

In the long term your dog needs to learn to be less afraid of loud noises. With proper treatment this is possible so that the next firework season will be less stressful for you and your dog.

We recommend Sounds Scary, an easy to follow therapy pack for dogs which includes a specially made set of high quality sound recordings and an easy to follow guide. The amount of training needed will vary from dog to dog so owners should start training with the Sounds Scary pack well in advance of firework seasons. Visit Sound Therapy 4 Pets for more information and to download the therapy pack.
 

Just for cats

  • Make sure your cat has somewhere to hide if it wants to. For example this may be under some furniture or in a quiet corner.
  • Don’t try and tempt your cat out as this will cause it to become more stressed.

Don’t forget small animals

  • If your pets live outside, partly cover cages, pens and aviaries with blankets so that one area is well sound-proofed. Make sure that your pet is still able to look out.
  • Provide lots of extra bedding so your pet has something to burrow in.”

Above quoted from http://www.rspca.org.uk/home

Photo credit:http://www.gainsborough.hackney.sch.uk
Photo credit:http://www.gainsborough.hackney.sch.uk

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

Insect Bites and Dogs.

Over the past few weeks Aussie Dog Care has seen an increasing number of dogs with insect bites so here is some fantastic advice on what to do and how to spot them on dogs. They are increasingly common in any pet!

 

“Symptoms

Insect bites on dogs can include the following reactions:

  • Swelling on the eyelids
  • Swelling on ear flaps
  • Swelling on the lips and in some cases the entire face. In this case, it is known as angiedema.
  • If the dog is bitten on the nose or mouth, it will lead to large swelling and the animal will have difficulty breathing
  • Urticaria, also known as “hives” which displays as welts are observed on the skin. These bites are usually itchy and can cause anaphylactic reactions.
  • Wheezing
  • Weakness
  • Unconsciousness
  • Weak pulse
  • Increased heart rate and fever which may cause the animal to go into shock.
  • Other symptoms of insect bites on dogs may lead to cold extremities, trembling, vomiting, diarrhea and collapse.

Blood sucking insects like mosquitoes, fleas, ticks, etc. cause swelling and irritation on the bite site. These insects contain some compounds in their saliva that aggravates this effect on the dog’s skin and may also cause tiny bumps on the skin. Spider bites cause large swollen bumps because the e spider bite contains an enzyme in the injected venom that leads to an allergic reaction on the dog’s skin.

Treatment

Few insect bites on dogs are extremely dangerous, but some can be very irritating and painful to your dog. There are some home remedies for treating insect bites on dogs that are safe and effective. Below are some suggestions:

  1. In the case of bee or wasp stings, apply aloe vera gel. It helps sooth the pain and burning sensation due to the sting or bite. 
  2. For bumps and sores, you can try gently applying a paste of baking soda and water several times a day till the bumps recede.
  3. For irritation, try applying milk of magnesia, calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream several times a day to ease the irritation. You can also apply regular oatmeal or colloidal oatmeal on the bite site to help relieve the irritation.
  4. As previously mentioned, remember to remove the stinger with a magnifying glass using a credit card or similar object. Once the stinger gone, bathe the area with a diluted solution of baking soda mixed with water. Prepare the solution by adding one part baking soda to several parts water. Apply a cold pack for several minutes to help reduce the swelling and pain. Repeat the cold pack several times a day. 
  5. You can mix 1 teaspoon of Epsom salt in 2 cups warm water and boil it. Keep it in the refrigerator to maintain its freshness. Bathe the dog with this mixture, to treat irritated and itchy paws and skin. To treat hot spots on skin, saturate a cotton ball with witch hazel and apply it to the spot for several days.

Many dogs develop allergic reactions to bites and stings that require immediate veterinary attention. If the bites are on the face, the swelling may obstruct the dog’s vision or breathing. If you find the dog is having trouble breathing or seems disoriented, take him to the vet immediately. You may need to seek veterinary attention if the dog is bitten by a spider, as their venom can cause a more serious reaction than bees or wasps.

It is very important to take care of your dog in case he is bitten by any insect. Even a minor mosquito bite can lead to an infection as the dog tends to keep scratching the itchy area. This can lead to infection by other pathogens which may cause other problems like pus or fever in your dog. Pet care is the owner’s responsibility. To give the best possible care to your dog please make sure you do not take insect bites lightly, as the life of your pet may depend on your alertness.”

Above quoted from http://www.petassure.com/newsletters/021510newsletter/02152010article2.html

 

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs

Fireworks and Animals!

The Firework season is fast approaching and at Aussie Dog Care we know how much distress any pet can go through during this season.

So here is some fantastic information from the RSPCA.

“Keeping cats and dogs secure

  • Make sure your dog or cat always has somewhere to hide if he or she wants to and has access to this place at all times. For example this could be under some furniture or in a cupboard.
  • During firework seasons, walk dogs during daylight hours and keep cats and dogs indoors when fireworks are likely to be set off.
  • At nightfall close windows and curtains and put on music to mask and muffle the sound of fireworks.
  • If your pet shows any signs of fear try to ignore their behaviour. Leave them alone unless they are likely to harm themselves.
  • Never punish or fuss over your pet when it’s scared as this will only make things worse in the long run.
  • Make sure your cat or dog is always kept in a safe and secure environment and can’t escape if there’s a sudden noise. Have your pet microchipped in case they do escape.

Just for dogs – before the firework  season starts

Planning ahead can help your dog cope with the firework season.

Talk to your vet about pheromone diffusers. These disperse calming chemicals into the room and may be a good option for your dog, in some cases your vet may even prescribe medication. If either of these options is used they should be used in conjunction with behavioural therapy. We would recommend asking your vet to refer you to a clinical animal behaviourist or using the ‘Sounds Scary’ therapy pack (see below).

Before the firework season starts provide your dog with a doggy safe haven, this should be a quiet area so choose one of the quietist rooms in your home. It should be a place where the animal feels it is in control, so don’t interfere with it when it’s in that area. Train your dog to associate the area with positive experiences eg. by leaving toys there but not imposing yourself at any time. Use a variety of toys and swap them regularly, putting them away when not in use so that your dog doesn’t become bored with them. With time your dog can learn that this place is safe and enjoyable. So when fireworks happen it may choose to go here because it knows that when it is here, no harm will come to it and so it’s more able to cope. It is important that your dog has access to its doggy safe haven at all times even when you’re not at home.
 

Just for dogs – when the fireworks start

  • Close any windows and black out the ‘doggy play area’ to remove any extra problems caused by flashing lights.
  • Each evening before the fireworks begin, move your dog to the play area and provide toys and other things that they enjoy. Make sure that there are things for you to do too so that your dog isn’t left alone.
  • Ignore the firework noises yourself. Play with a toy to see if your dog wants to join in, but don’t force them to play.
  • If you know a dog that isn’t scared by noises and which gets on well with your dog, then keeping the two together during the evenings may help your dog to realise that there’s no need to be afraid.

Sounds Scary – for dogs

In the long term your dog needs to learn to be less afraid of loud noises. With proper treatment this is possible so that the next firework season will be less stressful for you and your dog.

We recommend Sounds Scary, an easy to follow therapy pack for dogs which includes a specially made set of high quality sound recordings and an easy to follow guide. The amount of training needed will vary from dog to dog so owners should start training with the Sounds Scary pack well in advance of firework seasons. Visit Sound Therapy 4 Pets for more information and to download the therapy pack.
 

Just for cats

  • Make sure your cat has somewhere to hide if it wants to. For example this may be under some furniture or in a quiet corner.
  • Don’t try and tempt your cat out as this will cause it to become more stressed.

Don’t forget small animals

  • If your pets live outside, partly cover cages, pens and aviaries with blankets so that one area is well sound-proofed. Make sure that your pet is still able to look out.
  • Provide lots of extra bedding so your pet has something to burrow in.”

Above quoted from http://www.rspca.org.uk/home

The local areas I work/ cover in is Romiley , Stockport , Woodley, Bredbury , Hyde , Gee Cross , Hazel Grove , Godley , Disley , Marple , Marple Bridge , Glossop , Poynton , Higher Poynton , New Mills , Hayfield , Whaley Bridge , Mellor. If you are not situated in one of these areas do not hesitate to contact me as other areas are considered. These do not apply for home boarding.

Aussie Dog Care Email : ATHOMPS1@sky.com

Aussie Dog Care Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/AussieDogCareUk for updates when you go away for peace of mind as well as some walking clients.

Aussie Dog Care Twitter : https://twitter.com/AussieDogCare

Aussie Dog Care

The Best Care For Your Furry Friends.

Tailoring to your needs